Jihad threat report biased muslim students are more liberal than the average

Jihad threat report biased muslim students are more liberal than the average

By KALAN MATTHEWS

Washington Post Staff Writer

Friday, May 11, 1999; Page B9 This story from March of 2000 is another example of how the New York Times is pushing the Islamic faith. “I am a moderate and Muslim,” explains Mohammed Nafis, who identifies himself as a 19-year-old graduate student in political science at the American University in Cairo. “There are very conservative Muslims who don’t like being challenged.” Nafis says he’s not an advocate of violence, just someone who doesn’t agree with the political, economic and social agenda of the Muslim Brotherhood. But when the Times contacted him for an interview, he offered, among other points: I’m not an advocate of violence, just som카지노 사이트eone who doesn’t agree with the political, economic and social agenda of the Muslim Brotherhood. He explained that the Times article was “politically and socially” biased because the article’s focus on peaceful Islam was not the case. As I explained earlier, a person who’s not a supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood or a fanatic would argue that he’s not a moderate because he does not agree with those who advocate violence in their defense. Yet the Times clearly disagrees and makes no effort to correct its misrepresentation. A second example is a new report from The Boston Globe that seems to paint a picture of Muslim students as more liberal than the average student. The report quotes a Muslim from the University of Massachusetts who was asked by a repoapronxrter whether he thinks he should wear a headscarf while studying. His response: “I don’t see예스카지노 it as a crime,” as well as: “I don’t need [an] education; it’s not important to me.” This might appear to be a positive response for Muslim students at the university of Massachusetts. A number of Muslim students appear to be supportive of student protesters who demand a university of Islam. But, if the Muslim student were actually an advocate of violence, this would hardly raise eyebrows. After all, the Globe article says that some Muslim students do believe that it is important to study Islam. And yet, when questioned how many Muslim students he knows support or advocate for student protesters, Nafis said, “I’m not a supporter of violence.” The paper’s misrepresentation is also troubling because it appears to reflect the thinking of students at the university. I asked the University of Missouri, which has a large Muslim population, and it has asked The Daily Nation to respond. One of the articles that appeare